Quotes in Chalk #1

Lately I’ve been inspired by all of the chalk art I’ve seen on the interwebs, enough to buy some chalkboard paint and chalk and make my own boards to experiment on. I’m not up to the level of Dangerdust yet, but you know what they say about practice… In any case, there is something very alluring about the ephemeral nature of chalk art, and I’ve been having fun chalking away. Now if I could just figure out what to do about the piles of dust left behind…

ChalkQuote-1.a

ChalkQuote-1.b

ChalkQuote-1.c

japanese stab binding #44: fair isle

I named this one ‘fair isle’ because I’m very into knitting these days, and have tried a few stranded color-work projects. I think the Fair Isle knitting technique is more than I want to attempt just yet. But this was super easy! Anyway, 56 holes and mid-advanced beginner.

jsb-44

Tiffany Anne

My talented friend Tiffany and I bartered: I would create a name plaque for her and she would make a gift baby quilt for another friend of mine. Custom sketch, digitized, and then laser etched onto birch plywood. I’m not 100% happy with how the staining turned out. It looks great from some angles, but from others the words completely disappear! Live and learn. Oh, and because I did it all in Fontlab, I gave her the font so she can use ‘Tiffany Anne’ as a signature or tag on other projects. Fun!
TA-plaque1

TA-plaque2

Letter Fab-ulous

Had some fun at the Tulsa Fab Lab this last week, making items to use for a fundraiser. I’m heading back to grad school to work on an MA Typeface Design at the University of Reading in the UK. Eeek, it’s expensive!

I made nearly 500 coasters (would have been more, but the laser had a temporary malfunction) out of clear acrylic and white acrylic.
letter-fab-1

They look pretty cool when stacked! There isn’t any paint on these, unlike the HitchHiker’s Guide, because if the etched image is wide enough, it stands out just fine. Though I might still add paint to a few to change the color.
letter-fab-2

Then while lasering another project onto wood, there was extra space so I shrank the coaster design down to an earring size. Waste not, want not! Can’t wait to wear them! I have eight pairs. I’m thinking about having a giveaway on this blog with a pair as the prize…
letter-fab-3

I wish I had had time to design my own ampersand, but I really like this one from Charlemagne Standard. Laser-cut out of mirrored acrylic.
letter-fab-4

Also on the mirrored acrylic, a lettered design of one of my favorite words by the amazingly talented PetitSerif. Positive and negative etches.
letter-fab-8

This was my first time to seriously use the 3D printer. These below are cookie ‘stamps’. You press them into an unbaked sugar cookie to create the design. Printed with PLA filament on a Makerbot printer.
letter-fab-5

The laser cutter and the 3D printer both can take a while to run a project. So in the meantime…I experimented with the vinyl cutter. It was my first experience ever ‘weeding’, or removing the background of one sticker before applying it to a base sticker. Super tricky and tedious, if your design is really detailed! But a really neat effect if you get it right.
letter-fab-6

So many stickers! There is much weeding in my future…
letter-fab-7

japanese stab binding tutorial: hearts

jsb_21This is a beginning bind, with an intermediate level of holes (40). If you don’t want the gaps between the hearts, then repeat the steps marked in orange until you have the desired number. When you have reached the end of your line of hearts, wrap the left edge, then work your way back to the beginning through the middle of the hearts repeating the steps in blue. Be aware though, you will have to adjust the hole pattern. If you get completely lost, leave a comment with your question and I will try to answer it.

**click on an image to enlarge**

hole pattern
jsb.hearts.holes

sewing pattern
jsb.hearts

EXIT = needle pointed DOWN and ENTER = needle pointed UP
=====

enter 1 (leave a tail but don’t knot it), wrap around right edge,
enter 1 again
exit 2
enter 3
exit 4
enter 5
exit 6
enter 7
exit 6
enter 5
exit 4
enter 3
exit 2
enter 1, wrap around spine at angle to below 9,
enter 1 again
exit 8
enter 9
exit 10
enter 7, wrap around spine, thread needle through loop from 1, point right,
enter 7 again
exit 11
enter 12
exit 13
enter 14
exit 15
enter 16
exit 17
enter 16
exit 15
enter 14
exit 13
enter 12
exit 11, wrap around spine at angle to below 19,
exit 11 again
enter 18
exit 19
enter 20
exit 17, wrap around spine, thread needle through loop from 11, point right,
exit 17
enter 21
exit 22
enter 23
exit 24
enter 25
exit 26
enter 27
exit 26
enter 25
exit 24
enter 23
exit 22
enter 21, wrap around spine at angle to below 29,
enter 21 again
exit 28
enter 29
exit 30
enter 27, wrap around spice, thread needle through loop from 21, point right,
enter 27 again
exit 31
enter 32
exit 33
enter 34
exit 35
enter 36
exit 37
enter 36
exit 35
enter 34
exit 33
enter 32
exit 31, wrap around spine at angle to below 39,
exit 31 again
enter 38
exit 39
enter 40
exit 37, wrap around spine, thread needle through loop from 31, point right,
exit 37 again
wrap around left edge, exit 37 again
enter 40
exit 39
enter 38
exit 31
enter 27
exit 30
enter 29
exit 28
enter 21
exit 17
enter 20
exit 19
enter 18
exit 11
enter 7
exit 10
enter 9
exit 8, tie off

Le Petit Theatre de Rébecca

I was recently given this amazing French book by Rébecca Dautremer, and I just had to post some pictures of it. It has nearly 100 laser cut pages, and I cannot believe how intricate and how tiny some of the laser details are. The effect is much like the current experiments in ‘book excavation’ or the work of Brian Dettmer. I have to say, it’s inspiring me to think about what kind of effects I could achieve on the laser cutter that I have access to. I’ll have to check out what it does to paper!

le petit theatre de rebecca-1

le petit theatre de rebecca-2

le petit theatre de rebecca-3

le petit theatre de rebecca-4

le petit theatre de rebecca-5